Etching History for Outlander One Glass at a Time | Outlander Cast

For the full article see link below.

Upon leaving school in the late 1970s, Wilma began her apprenticeship at Edinburgh Crystal. The artistry involved in this kind of work is so specific that I asked Wilma what appealed to her about the process of glass engraving. “It is a two-dimensional form of art and very challenging, which is why I really like it.” Interestingly, Wilma also does illustrations, paintings, and carves etchings for shepherds’ crooks and walking sticks. Given the propensity of sheep and hill walkers in Scotland, I can see why this additional skill might prove useful!

“They initially wanted 24 glasses in a week’s time!,” Wilma says. “After I explained to them this wasn’t possible, I engraved four glasses to start with and then completed the rest in short order. After the glasses, I went on to engrave a decanter and a portrait glass.”

Wilma MacKenzie

 

So, what are Jacobite Glasses, you ask? According to the Corning Museum of Glass, Jacobite Glasses were 18th century drinking vessels most often used for toasting Prince Charles Edward Stuart a.k.a. Bonnie Prince Charlie, a.k.a. the “Young Pretender.” As Claire Randall correctly pointed out in Outlander Season 1, the term “Jacobite” is derived from the Latin for “James” referring to James Edward Stuart—King James VIII—the Bonnie Prince’s exiled father. Supporters of the King were referred to as “Jacobites.” Before the defeat of the Bonnie Prince and his armies in 1746, Jacobite glasses were usually engraved with the English rose, representing the Crown, and an optimistic motto such as “Redeat” (Latin for “May he return.”) After 1746 some of the glasses contained cryptic symbols and messages. More from Wilma on that later!

It was just over two years ago when Wilma got a call from one of the props managers from the Outlander production team asking if she could engrave Jacobite glass. Wilma’s friends, Mike and Sue Hunter at Twist Glass Studio in Selkirk made the glasses and then passed Wilma’s name along to Outlander as someone who could do the engravings.

Glass artist Wilma MacKenzie talks about etching history from her Scotland studio as she helped recreate the Jacobite glasses in Outlander Season 2.

Source: Etching History for Outlander One Glass at a Time | Outlander Cast

Gallery of Old Photographs Of Tarbert

Cottage, Baluachdrach, Old Photo, Historical Photos, Tarbert Loch Fyne, Argyll & Bute, Scotland, West Coast, Scottish Highlands
Cottage at Baluachdrach

A trip down memory lane, beautiful photographs from Tarbert.

If you have any you would like to see added to this collection please contact me and I will add them , with full credit to the photo’s going to you.

To view greater detail, just click on the images to enlarge to full size.

The pictures in this gallery have been collected from public internet images, if any pictures in here belong to you please contact me so I can add your details to them.

Some of these images appear on other websites, check out

https://www.paddlesteamers.org/scottish/waverleys-sabbath-trip-to-tarbert/

http://tour-scotland-photographs.blogspot.co.uk/

https://www.thecastlesofscotland.co.uk/the-best-castles/scenic-castles/tarbert-castle/

https://hiveminer.com/User/Angela%20Towndrow/Timeline

Loch Fyne Diving

I found this article while browsing the internet, it has been copied to a site from Dive magazine, so I looked up  Mike Clark and found not only his blog, but his beautiful photography; the online home of professional underwater photographer Mike Clark

and his book Wrecks and Reefs of Southeast Scotland

If you would like a signed copy, contact Mike.

“Some folk in Scotland sing Its A Long Way to Inverary, but I was beyond that, and now singing Its A Long Way To Tarbert. It may not scan as well, but it was true.

After three hours of driving along narrow Lochside roads, I had already passed Inverary on Loch Fynes west side. It would be another 20 minutes before I arrived in the beautiful fishing port and village of Tarbert.

It is guarded by the remains of the great Bruces Castle, and a natural bay and inlet form a beautifully scenic harbour. I had never been this far down the loch before and the diving would all be new to me, as it generally is to the brave adventurers who make it to this point.

I met Malcolm Goodchild, owner of the weekends dive charter Little Blue. As the other divers enjoyed their breakfast at the B&B, I had my cylinders topped up on the dive centres compressor.

I started to feel guilty about my earlier complaints as I realised that the other divers had driven for more than six hours to get here.

This was the groups third trip in a row to see Malcolm, proof to me that the diving would be worth the effort.

The Garden
Topside, Loch Fyne is beautiful along its entire length. Its the second longest sea loch in Scotland. I had dived in the loch on a number of occasions, though never this near its mouth, and encountered a number of strange creatures such as spiny spider crabs and nudibranchs.

A force 8 gale was forecast and while this would not concern divers at the more sheltered sites further up the loch, it could affect us here. Skipper Malcolm was therefore careful with his initial site selection.

The Garden is situated on the eastern side of the loch. As this is the more exposed, it was decided to dive it before the heavy weather came in.

The sky was clear and the vis good as I dropped into the green water and descended to the top of the reef at around 15m.

Initially this was plain old rock covered in brittlestars, but sand chutes led the way over the edge of the reef, and soon I was dropping down the steep slope to 30m, where it got dark.

The slope also eased up here, and a sandy seabed extended as far as I could see in the 7m vis, still dropping away but at a much gentler rate.

I started noticing life everywhere.

Large groups of up to 12 squat lobsters lined the entrance of every crack and crevice. They were so packed in that they couldnt move away when

I photographed them. It must be the only area of overcrowding in and around Loch Fyne.

On the sea floor, my torchlight picked out the eyes of scallops partially buried in the sand. These and a few big edible crabs would make up the staple diet of the visiting divers from Hartlepool for the next few days.

I started my ascent and sparkling green Devonshire cup corals made interesting subjects. But it was when I got back up to around 18m that the most impressive feature of the dive presented itself.

Initially I must have landed on the only piece of barren rock down here, as a dense covering of dead mens fingers covered the wall, before being displaced with colonies of massive plumose anemones. I had never seen these animals grow to such a size before! They were easily more than half a metre tall, vast pillars of orange and white forming a forest over the top of the reef.

Schools of small pollack darted between them, but sheltering in the forest were big old edible crabs, butterfish and the aggressive velvet-backed swimming crabs, whose red eyes glared from their cover as they tried to make their escape. I used up the remainder of my film on the top of the pinnacle around 10m down.

We had got off to a great start, but having watched the CD-Rom Malcolm had sent me, I was itching to get onto one  of the little puffer wrecks I had seen on my PC screen. After returning to Tarbert and looking around the ruins of Robert the Bruces castle, we were off to dive the Arran III.

Arran III

I had often thought about diving this wreck from the shore. Once at the site the reality of the task dawned on me, and I was glad that I hadnt bothered.

It looked a long way, though dedicated divers do make the trek. Little Blue makes the dive a lot more comfortable.

Falling over the stern, I followed the instructions given by Malcolm. I landed at the stern of Arran III at around 12m. This is the only section of the wreck that remains intact.

This Clyde puffer, or small steamboat, had run straight onto the rocks on the first day of 1932. As you would expect, the bows are completely broken up in 5m. There is still a lot of wreckage to explore, even if it is covered with kelp in the summer months.

Finning aft to the stern, the wreck gradually takes shape and scenic spars coated with red seaweed rise like clutching fingers. Lifeboat davits and mooring bollards are clearly visible.

Beneath the stern, a group of massive edible crabs was noted and it was good hunting for the Hartlepool club.

Back at the stern, I hung about and tried to capture an image of the massive pollack that patrol the area. They would shoot off when my flash fired, only to circle and take up the same holding position. There is also a big conger eel on the wreck that Malcolm called Curly.

I didnt find him, but other divers did.

He was out posing for pictures.

The Arran III, like all Clyde puffers, made deliveries to all the Clyde ports. Many of these, such as those in Loch Fyne, were in extremely remote areas where no road communication was possible. She met her fate while returning from Lochgilphead with empty beer bottles for recycling.

A storm with severe south-easterly gales blew up, and from that direction the winds could run right up the loch.

As Arran III approached Tarbert, she became more exposed to the fury of the storm. In the terrible conditions at 6.30am that Hogmanay, she ran aground on a reef east of Baltimore island. Badly holed, she sank on the next high tide. Her cargo was salvaged.

Margaret Niven

Next morning,  after emptying a couple of beer bottles the night before, I was glad of the civilised 9.30 start. The poor weather had arrived but was doing little to affect the sea state, as it was all coming from a westerly direction.

Very close to the resting place of the Arran III lies another puffer, and it was to be my favourite dive of the weekend.

I was first in and onto the Margaret Niven, which is a great benefit if you want to photograph it. The shotline was attached to the prow in just over 28m. The green water had turned black but my eyes soon adjusted to the gloom. Vis was a respectable 6m but it soon shrank to 3m once the bottom-huggers arrived.

The whole bow section lay before me, rising a couple of metres out of the muddy seabed. First there was a set of large winches and bollards. After that, the hold opened and the cargo of road chippings was clearly visible.

The Clyde puffers were working to put themselves out of business by delivering the raw materials to build the highways.

At the stern, the main points of interest were a large boiler with a tiny one-cylinder engine directly behind it – the powerhouse behind the whole Clyde transport system of the early

20th century.

Dropping over the stern and down a couple of metres, I could see the small prop and the rudder hard to starboard, perhaps thrust there in a last-ditch effort to avoid the rock on which Margaret Niven ended her sailing days.

She must have sunk fairly quickly, as the wreck lies 10m off the bottom of that very rock. If you feel comfortable about it, you can fin straight off the bows for 10m and ascend up the vertical cliff. This will give you plenty of interest to help you wile away your deco stops.

Kelp obscures everything above 6m, but the wall is covered in soft corals. The cracks and crevices are home to edible crabs and the guys from Hartlepool all saw lesser-spotted dogfish on every dive, with a few noted on the cliff here. These small sharks are common in the loch. Catch a lazy one and it will make a great photographic subject.

Moyle Rock

After a long steam up the loch we arrived at Moyle Rock, a submerged pinnacle. After the long wait, it was all go as soon as we reached at the site.

It was billed as similar to the Garden, which was magic. The difference was that Malcolm, who is also a keen diver, had apparently seen plumose anemones that made the Gardens look small.

I found the site under water by hitting the pinnacle at 18m and working up to around 6m, but with not a lot to show for it. I was about to surface when flashes of orange and white caught my eye. I headed south, and soon plumose anemones appeared, though they could not rival those of the Garden.

I think I was on the right site, and none of the other divers saw anything much apart from another dogfish.

If you have the choice, I would always opt for the Garden rather than waste time steaming to this site. However, on the way back we had the bonus of noting a large group of porpoises heading up the loch.

Back in Tarbert, it was pack-up time and then a three-hour drive home. Was it worth it You bet – the diving is great and relaxed, and Malcolm is a cheerful skipper who provides excellent briefings based on diving knowledge along with the hot drinks and chocolate biscuits.

Tarbert is a beautiful place, where people still say hello and pass the time of day. The pubs are great for a couple of nice pints post-meal. Give it a try.”

Source

Kilberry Scarecrow Festival

We took a drive along the Kilberry Road for the scarecrow festival.
As always there was quite a good mix, including a brilliant Tim Peake/Rocket man David Bowie!
Marvel Superhero’s with an epic battle between Batman and Spiderman!
We found Donald Trump, Trumping and Jack Sparrow chillin’ on the hill.

A few had been battered from the strong wind the night before but most had survived.
The scarecrow festival happens every year and is organised by the Ormsary District Social Club.
Today (Easter Monday) at the hall they are having an Easter event with an Easter Egg trail for the children while serving tea, coffee and homebaking before they announce the winning scarecrow.

I wouldn’t want to be the judge there are so many great ‘crows along the road!

Apologies for those I didn’t manage to photograph, I know there were a few more but I didn’t get the chance to stop off at all of them.

Thanks to everyone that takes part, I look forward to them every year.

Here’s hoping we see even more next year!

 

Kung Fu Panda 3 And Dad’s Army

Kung Fu Panda 3

The Screen Machine is coming back to Tarbert on the 12 April 2016!
When Po’s long-lost panda father suddenly reappears, the reunited duo travels to a secret panda paradise to meet scores of hilarious new panda characters.

But when the supernatural villain Kai begins to sweep across China defeating all the kung fu masters, Po must do the impossible-learn to train a village full of his fun-loving, clumsy brethren to become the ultimate band of Kung Fu Pandas.

Living large and loving life, Po (Jack Black) realizes that he has a lot to learn if he’s going to fulfill the next challenge from his beloved instructor (Dustin Hoffman).
After reuniting with his long-lost father (Bryan Cranston), Po must transition from student to teacher and train a group of fun-loving, clumsy pandas to become martial-arts fighters.
Together, the kung-fu brethren unite to take on the evil Kai (J.K. Simmons), a supernatural warrior who becomes stronger with each battle.

Check out some of the reviews online! If you loved the others in the series this one is said to be the best Kung Fu Panda film yet!

 

Also Showing is the new Dad’s Army film.

Dad’s Army is a 2016 British war comedy film, based on the BBC television sitcom Dad’s Army. Directed by Oliver Parker, set in 1944, after the events depicted in the television series.
The story sees Catherine Zeta-Jones play a glamorous journalist, who is sent to report on the Walmington-on-Sea Home Guard platoon.
This is all before MI5 discovers that there is a German spy, hiding in the fictional British town.

While looking on youtube for the trailers I found this great little film by Armin Grewe giving you a virtual tour of the Screen Machine when it visited Islay.

Pets Welcome!

Pets Welcome

With so many woodland and coastal walks  it is so easy to find the perfect tranquil spot to unwind and give you that well earned peace a holiday on the West Coast can bring.

For a huge majority of us, there is always that problem of finding a place to stay that welcomes pets.

Some kennels offer a great service in taking care of your pets while you have a break, but here in Scotland there are many fabulous walks that your dog will love just as much as you would!

I decided to ask online so I could quickly gather a list of all pet friendly place to stay in and around Tarbert, so in no order of preference here is what we have so far;

West Loch Hotel, a short walk from the centre of the village on the shores of West Loch, easy access to forestry walks, you are also very close to the starting point of The Kintyre Way, a beautiful walk that criss crosses the whole of the Kintyre Peninsular.

The Kintyre Way

Also at West Loch are a selection of cosy lodges set on a hill they have spectacular views over the Loch.
West Loch Shores are set right beside Corranbuie, a natural woodland beside forestry land, you can follow the track all the way along to bring you back to Tarbert village.

The track is popular with other walkers, runners and dog walkers.
Although more often that not you can walk the full track without seeing another soul.
Also at West Loch you will find Kayak Majik, you can hire a canoe, try sea kayaking, even meet some of our local seal population,
A truly relaxing way to explore the lochs.

Argyll Haven also sits at the West Loch, another lodge sat in a quiet and beautiful location yet not too far from the village centre, surrounded by forest overlooking the loch. What better place to unwind!

Have you ever tried Glamping?
Well now you can, and what’s more you can bring your dogs too!
Stonefield Farm Holidays have small and cosy wooden wigwams, allowing you to enjoy the fun of camping outside but with the comfort of a sturdy and cosy shelter with washing and cleaning facilities.
There is also a coffee and farm shop on site serving fresh, local produce.

Tarbert From The Hills

In the village The Tarbert Hotel allows pets, with a friendly bar and delicious food it is another popular place to stay!

Also overlooking the beautiful Harbour is The Islay Frigate Hotel, it has a popular bar, a harbour view restaurant and a beer garden out the back, a pretty little sun trap to sit and relax in.

Overlooking the Tarbert Church is the Cullins Bed and Breakfast, a perfect base to relax after a day of exploring.

Just outside of the village, before you come in to Tarbert are Barfad Self Catering Holiday Cottages set in farmland, surrounded by woodland and near the shores of Loch Fyne.
There are 2 Cottages Available At Barfard the underlined text takes you to their site for further details. Lesley from the Loch Fyne Gallery told me on the All Things Tarbert Facebook Page

“Years before I had my cottage in Tarbert, I stayed at Barfad Farmlands a couple of times with dogs, the cottages were lovely, and direct access to White Shore was fab for the dogs. I met people with dogs over the summer who stay regularly, so they obviously still allow them”

So much exploring for a pup to do!

Barmore Farm Holiday Cottages at Stonefield are also pet friendly, currently their website doesn’t have all the info, but there are more details and photos at Hoseasons holiday site.

Sitting right on the shores of Loch Fyne near Stonefield castle is Shore Cottage, a peaceful retreat in beautiful surroundings.

Skipness is one of my personal favourite places, you can walk there from Tarbert, see the map on the Kintyre Way Website for the specific details for the track.
Be warned you may meet livestock on some sections.

The Seafood Cabin offers freshly prepared sea food along with tea and coffee, see their website for opening times and the menu.

If you visit Skipness do visit the castle, in the Summer the tower is opened allowing you to climb up to the top for magnificent views on a clear day.

Skipness Holiday Cottages are in a fantastic location, with beautiful walks and stunning views over to the Isle Of Arran, it is breathtakingly beautiful all year round.
Contact Sophie and ask for a brochure and booking form

Scotland, it’s very cool in Winter! <3

On the other side of West Loch is The B8024, with spectacular views of Kintyre and the Inner Hebrides, Jura, Islay, Gigha, if you come all the way to Tarbert you really should take a gentle drive along this road!

Dunmore Villa and Anchor Cottage sit right on the shore, totally wonderful if you love the sea!
Both are large, private self catering holiday lets with total privacy.

A short drive past the villa and slightly up the hill on your right is Dunmore Court, with self catering cottages in a shared courtyard.
Surrounded by ancient Oak woodland and wildlife with beautiful views from the hills.

Back over on the right hand side, with views over the loch, a few miles from Dumore Court is Barr Na Criche offering self catering or bed and breakfast holiday accommodation. It is a perfect get away from it all! Relax on the shores of the loch, walk miles through forest or countryside track or drive into one of the little villages for fine foods and excellent hospitality!

Standing Stones Loch Stornoway, Knapdale

Port Bàn Holiday Park is further along the road, it is set in a beautiful location and you are able to rent or buy a static caravan here.
You can also camp there with pitches for tents and hook ups for tourers and caravans.
Totally pet friendly, the whole site has poop bags and bins, making cleaning up easy, please keep all dogs on the lead on site.

Still within roughly a 30 minute drive from Tarbert Harbour is the beautiful Ellary Estate the cottages and chalets are situated on the Loch Caolisport side of Ellary Estate.
The cottages all stand in their own grounds, offering privacy and seclusion and are equipped with everything that you are likely to require on your holiday.

Just across the loch from Tarbert Harbour is the Portavadie Mariner with a superb spa and leisure centre.
The cottages and studio apartments are dog-friendly so you can bring your dog too!
The ferry trip takes less than half an hour, so it’s easy to pop over and back again.
Take a look at all the facilities on offer at Portavadie there is so much to see and do you will be wanting another holiday after your holiday! Set in beautiful surroundings with luxury accommodation.

Ferry To Portavadie. Photo by Blue Wave Services.

The George Hotel at Inveraray also accepts dogs, take a look at some of the virtual tours on their website for an excellent view of the rooms available.

Going further afield but still within easy travelling distance Mellow Melfort accepts all pets.
They have accommodation to suit a wide range of needs.

If you have holiday accommodation and allow pets in or near Tarbert please contact me and I will add your details.

If you are booking a holiday with your pets, please make sure you inform the owner you intend to bring pets, be sure you are happy and agree with any terms and conditions they may have prior to booking.
Please clean up after your pets and keep them under control around wildlife and livestock.

Thank you

On The Road, A Visual Tour

Click Image To Enlarge

I am not a great photographer, but as we travel through the hills and beside the lochs there are so many breathtaking views, so here is a short post, loaded with pictures and videos of the B8024 (Just go through Tarbert, past Stonefield Wigwams, then turn right as though going to Tarbert Golf Course.

Then do a left onto the B8024, the road follows alongside the shores of West Loch.

A Coo!

Just follow the road, be mindful of the passing places as you may need to give way to farming or forestry vehicles, if you stop for photos or to enjoy the view, make sure you have left room for other vehicles to pass.

Allow yourself plenty of time to explore, or just relax and take in the stunning scenery and crisp, fresh air.

Port Ban Holiday Park, A Romantic Beach Just Before A Snow Flurry

Along the road you will find an excellent holiday park with static caravans and camping pitches.
Port Ban Holiday Park is set in a fantastic location and is perfect for extra guests if you are planing on getting married in such a beautiful spot.

See Crear Weddings for further info.
It is also a perfect location for family holidays, with sandy beaches and craggy coastlines there is plenty for little ones to do.

For Naturalists, it is wonderful all year round, with wildlife in abundance!
You don’t have to wait long to see Seals, Buzzards, Deer, Otters and much more.

If you have time, take a small diversion and see the sculptured stones that have been stored under cover to protect them from the elements, you can read more about them here.

Sandy beaches and rolling hills

Of course, you could just sit back, relax and enjoy the views (even better if someone else is driving)

A Common Seal In Loch Caolisport
The Weather Seems To Change With Each Twist And Turn
Rocky Beaches

And Raging Burns

Short Films

Click to enlarge

I have set up a Youtube channel to add the short films I have been putting on Facebook and Google+.
More recently inspired by playing around with the phone settings while out with the dogs.
They are all short and at the moment there are only a few but I have embedded the playlist so it will grow in time.
It’s just a bit of fun, but it shows the forests and lochs etc, if you enjoy walking you should be inspired.

Storm Desmond 5th December 2015

Just a couple of videos I made while playing with my phone walking the dogs, it’s still very rough out there so please be careful.
If you are travelling locally and you have a facebook account bookmark the A83 Facebook Group for regular news, photos and updates from the people on the roads.