Queensgate 3 Bedroom Victorian Holiday Villa

Amidst a stunning backdrop, this spacious Victorian first floor holiday villa sits only yards from the Loch Fyne shoreline and boasts panoramic views over Loch Fyne and the Cowal Peninsula.

Tarbert, the gateway to Kintyre, offers local shops, pubs and restaurants and local events include the  Scottish Series yacht race, Tarbert Music Festival and Tarbert Fair.

The Kintyre Peninsula is renowned for its rugged beauty and beautiful beaches with The Kintyre Way.

Along 100 miles over 4-7 days you can discover hidden coves, deserted beaches, woods & forests, castles & fishing villages and an abundance of wildlife. Stretching from Tarbert in the North to Machrihanish in the South, the seven graded & way-marked sections offer a variety of walking terrain from serious hiking to gentle rambles.

It is in an ideal location to explore the local area, including the villages of Skipness with its castle and seafood shack, Carradale, Campbeltown, Machrihanish with its world-famous golf course and the Mull of Kintyre. Ferries to the islands of Islay, Gigha, Jura and Arran are easily accessed as is the ferry to Ireland from Campbeltown.

Wildlife is abundant with red squirrels, sika and roe deer, feral goats and a large variety of birdlife, including red grouse, hen harriers, buzzards and Eagles.

Machrihanish is also home to the Sea Bird and Wildlife Observatory. Seals and otters are seen regularly, and whale watching tours are available from Campbeltown in the summer months. There are also many golf courses nearby, including the links course at Machrihanish. Beach 20 yards. Shop and restaurant 100 yards, pub 150 yards.

For further details and to book online click here!

QUEENSGATE, Tarbert: Holiday cottage for rent. View 17 photos, book online with traveller protection with the manager – 3573930

Source: Click here for more images and to book online

Part 8, The Nancy Glen Campaign Continues

A coffee morning was held at Templar Arts And Leisure Centre, at the time of going to press they had raised £13,000!

Nancy Glen’ coffee afternoon in the Templars Hall, Tarbert.
Nancy Glen coffee afternoon in the Templar Hall, Tarbert.

An incredible amount from such a small village!

TALC Coffee morning, fundraiser. Photo from Argyllshire advertiser

On the 3rd of February a candle was was switched on by Mathew Ramsay of the Fishermen’s Mission at the harbour and will stay on until the men are returned to their families.

The candle is housed in a case which features photographs of the missing men, thought to be still aboard the wreck, and the Nancy Glen itself.

Robert Macleod thanked everyone for coming in the Tarbert Facebook group.

Thank you all for coming tonight.

As I said this evening [Tarbert] you are a remarkable village and people! Every day since the 18th January 2018, when the Nancy Glen sunk in the waters of Lochfyne ‘All Things Tarbert’ reminds me and others of your heart and generosity.

Thank you for turning out tonight because it communicates your continuing compassion, sympathy and solidarity to Gosia, Dawn and their children as well as the extended MacDougal family that you are with them, thinking of them, feeling for them and living with the same hope as them – that we will be able to bring the boys home.

We gathered tonight to do something very symbolic! Light a candle – a candle that will remain lit until that moment of the boys return becomes a reality.

Candles do not talk but they speak! They have a variety of spiritual and symbolic meanings: adoration, love, sacrifice, joy, hope and mourning to name but a few – and without using words they speak. When Mathew Ramsay, Fishermen’s Mission representative lit the candle on the quay tonight it spoke to many hurting hearts. Doubtless, it will continue to speak to our community until the boys are home.
Again, our thanks to Catriona Hood and Kenny MacNab for their contributions – most of all our thanks to you for coming along on a cold winter’s night. May what we did tonight be the first and last time we have to do so!

The Loch Fyne Pipe Band have posted a cryptic message on their page, so keep an eye on their page for further details of the project!

On the official Nancy Glen Fundraising Facebook Page, one kind fellow fisherman has offered his car as a raffle prize, so do buy a ticket!

There is also an auction for you to bid on a luxurious break at  La Casa De Abajo Villa, Costa del Sol

The Lodge Loch Fyne 754 raised over £1000 with their coffee morning this morning!

Scottish Canals are holding a fundraising raffle!

Here’s how it works:

  1. Donate whatever you can on the Just Giving Site here 
  2. Send a screen shot as proof of entry that has your name and the amount you’ve donated with the text “Scottish Canals raffle” to Helen.Cunningham@scottishcanals.co.uk
  3. You’ll then receive one raffle number by email for every £10 donated
  4. We’ll hold the draw on the 01/04/2018 electronically using a random picker
  5. Winners notified by email

Prizes

  1. A 2 week licence for use on any Scottish Canal.
  2. Crinan Canal return transit
  3. Trip for 4 on the Falkirk Wheel including lunch to a value of £40
  4. Free entry for 4 to the Kelpies
  5. Others to be announced

To be continued

If you are fundraising for the Nancy Glen Campaign and I have not yet covered your event you can leave a message below or contact me direct.

I still have many more to add so bookmark Tarbert Online and check back soon.

Part 7 Of The Nancy Glen Campaign

Gayle Campbell, Alfie, Busking, Fundraising, Tarbert, Fishermen, Nancy Glen TT100
Alfie Busking by Gayle Campbell

Almost a month has passed since the Nancy Glen sank with two crew members aboard.

So many people have thrown themselves into fundraisers to help raise funds to bring the boys home.

I plan to cover them all, as every effort is appreciated.

I hadn’t thought for a moment what a huge task keeping track of them all would be, so many fantastic people, thank you, each and every one.

Above is Alfie, Busking outside Lochgilphead Co-Op and managed to raise £194.49 for the Nancy Glen Campaign!

The Carradale Scouts sent messages of love and sympathy.

Robert Macleod‎,Carradale Scouts, Messages,
Messages of support from the Carradale Scouts

While at Tarbert Academy, they organised a non uniform day and raised over £400 and raised over £100 more with a collection bucket at the Argyll and Bute awards at Helensburgh.

There will also be another fundraising event by Tarbert Academy in March.

Mirrin and Sophie both just 8 years old, walked from Westport Beach to Macrihanish and raised over £2500!

Mirrin And Sophie, nancy Glen Fundraiser
Mirrin And Sophie Walked From Westport Beach to Macrihanish

Robert Crumlish posted in all things Tarbert from Mull

Hello folks. We had a fundraising weekend raising money for the Nancy Glen fund. Lots of people in Mull got involved including the schools. They raised an amazing £971 collectively. We had a raffle with some brilliant prizes kindly donated by people across Mull and beyond. We are very pleased to announce that the total raised so far is £5110. Also a cheque from Calmac for £100 which we will send on tomorrow along with the transfer of the other funds. We plan on holding more events soon to add some much needed funds to the pot. On behalf of myself, JohnLindsay and Johnny, I would like to thank everyone who has helped us reach this amazing target. Much love from one fishing community to another. Xx

A friend in Helensburgh sent me this photo Players, coaches, family and friends of HelensburghFC are walking round Helensburgh on a sponsored 2 mile walk to raise money for the families of the Nancy GlenHelensbu On Sunday 4th February

Families and friends of Helensburgh FC plan to do a 2 mile walk in memory of the Nancy Glen fishing Boat and to raise funds to help the families of those affected.

The Nancy Glen fishing boat of Tarbert was tragically taken by the West Coast of Scotland waters it fished. One fisherman survived, sadly the two other crew Duncan MacDougall and Przemek Krawczyk have not been found although it’s thought they were on the vessel which now lies on the seabed.

The families wish to retrieve their loved ones as soon as possible,which will take great resource. In addition the fishermen have left wives and young children behind. Helensburgh FC have forged strong links with both the football and also wider community of Tarbert and we want to help do all we can to assist these families at this time and in the future. We ask for support in this task. Please give generously so that these families may lay their men to rest and that their children are supported through the tough times ahead.

I would ask that as many of you as possible donate anything you can and join us on the walk through Helensburgh.

https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/gordon-brodie

Continue to part 8

Salmond tells ‘heartless’ UK Government to raise boat wreck

FORMER First Minister Alex Salmond has called on the UK Government to pay for the raising of the Nancy Glen fishing boat which sank in Loch Fyne, with the bodies of missing fishermen Duncan MacDougall and Przemek Krawczyk thought to be on board.

The Clyde Fishermen’s Association and the men’s families have started fundraising campaigns to salvage the boat so that the two men can be buried ashore, with almost £150,000 raised in just a few days.

Read more 

FORMER First Minister Alex Salmond has called on the UK Government to pay for the raising of the Nancy Glen fishing boat which sank in Loch Fyne,…

Source: Salmond tells ‘heartless’ UK Government to raise boat wreck

An Incredible Show Of Support For The Nancy Glen Campaign!

In less than a week the Clyde Fisherman Trust Nancy Glen Campaign has raised over £130,000.

Support is coming in from far and wide as people picked up the tags #TT100bringtheboyshome, #TT100bringourboyshome  linking to the Just Giving, Go Fund Me and Crowdfunding donation pages and being tweeted, shared, retweeted as much as possible to raise awareness of the campaign.

Social media is a hive of activity and the response is incredible!

The Facebook Group All Things Tarbert Currently has a steady stream of posts as people share ideas and try to do whatever they can to help.

Local businesses have also set up donation boxes in their shops.

The Tweeting on Twitter is constant, I’m sure many of us are struggling to keep up with the notifications!

Behind all the social media noise is a devastated community, heartbroken friends and family that will not give up until they have brought them home.

Charity auctions are being set up, raffles and other fund raising ideas are in the pipeline, words of support from all over the world.

A Facebook page has now been set up to enable people to keep track of what is happening and where, so please do like and follow

The Nancy Glen Fundraising Page.

 

 

On BBC News

A spokesman said: “Fishing is more than just a political issue, it’s people’s lives and in this instance so many who find their world so tragically turned upside down.

“The fund hopes to raise enough to recover the men and allow their families comfort in being able to lay their loved ones to rest after such a horrible and tragic event.

“The Clyde Fishermen’s Association also continues to engage with our Royal Navy and hopes they can help the recovery with their specialist deep water equipment.”

If you can help in any way, by sharing on social media or sending in a donation it would be very much appreciated.

If you would like to share ideas and network with other fundraisers follow the Facebook page or you can contact The Clyde Fishermans Trust Nancy Glen Campaign.

 

Firework Display

Tarbert Firework Display

The Beilding 7 PM

Under new management, this year the firework display will be held on the 3rd November at the beilding.

Refreshments availavble at the outdoor gym or fire station.

The Loch Fyne Pipe Band will be playing from 6:30 at the outdoor gym

Fundraising for next years display.

Loch Fyne Pipe band, tarbert, Tarbert Loch Fyne, Fire station, Outdoor gym, Beilding
Tarbert Firework Display

 

Gallery of Old Photographs Of Tarbert

Cottage, Baluachdrach, Old Photo, Historical Photos, Tarbert Loch Fyne, Argyll & Bute, Scotland, West Coast, Scottish Highlands
Cottage at Baluachdrach

A trip down memory lane, beautiful photographs from Tarbert.

If you have any you would like to see added to this collection please contact me and I will add them , with full credit to the photo’s going to you.

To view greater detail, just click on the images to enlarge to full size.

The pictures in this gallery have been collected from public internet images, if any pictures in here belong to you please contact me so I can add your details to them.

Some of these images appear on other websites, check out

https://www.paddlesteamers.org/scottish/waverleys-sabbath-trip-to-tarbert/

http://tour-scotland-photographs.blogspot.co.uk/

https://www.thecastlesofscotland.co.uk/the-best-castles/scenic-castles/tarbert-castle/

https://hiveminer.com/User/Angela%20Towndrow/Timeline

Loch Fyne Diving

I found this article while browsing the internet, it has been copied to a site from Dive magazine, so I looked up  Mike Clark and found not only his blog, but his beautiful photography; the online home of professional underwater photographer Mike Clark

and his book Wrecks and Reefs of Southeast Scotland

If you would like a signed copy, contact Mike.

“Some folk in Scotland sing Its A Long Way to Inverary, but I was beyond that, and now singing Its A Long Way To Tarbert. It may not scan as well, but it was true.

After three hours of driving along narrow Lochside roads, I had already passed Inverary on Loch Fynes west side. It would be another 20 minutes before I arrived in the beautiful fishing port and village of Tarbert.

It is guarded by the remains of the great Bruces Castle, and a natural bay and inlet form a beautifully scenic harbour. I had never been this far down the loch before and the diving would all be new to me, as it generally is to the brave adventurers who make it to this point.

I met Malcolm Goodchild, owner of the weekends dive charter Little Blue. As the other divers enjoyed their breakfast at the B&B, I had my cylinders topped up on the dive centres compressor.

I started to feel guilty about my earlier complaints as I realised that the other divers had driven for more than six hours to get here.

This was the groups third trip in a row to see Malcolm, proof to me that the diving would be worth the effort.

The Garden
Topside, Loch Fyne is beautiful along its entire length. Its the second longest sea loch in Scotland. I had dived in the loch on a number of occasions, though never this near its mouth, and encountered a number of strange creatures such as spiny spider crabs and nudibranchs.

A force 8 gale was forecast and while this would not concern divers at the more sheltered sites further up the loch, it could affect us here. Skipper Malcolm was therefore careful with his initial site selection.

The Garden is situated on the eastern side of the loch. As this is the more exposed, it was decided to dive it before the heavy weather came in.

The sky was clear and the vis good as I dropped into the green water and descended to the top of the reef at around 15m.

Initially this was plain old rock covered in brittlestars, but sand chutes led the way over the edge of the reef, and soon I was dropping down the steep slope to 30m, where it got dark.

The slope also eased up here, and a sandy seabed extended as far as I could see in the 7m vis, still dropping away but at a much gentler rate.

I started noticing life everywhere.

Large groups of up to 12 squat lobsters lined the entrance of every crack and crevice. They were so packed in that they couldnt move away when

I photographed them. It must be the only area of overcrowding in and around Loch Fyne.

On the sea floor, my torchlight picked out the eyes of scallops partially buried in the sand. These and a few big edible crabs would make up the staple diet of the visiting divers from Hartlepool for the next few days.

I started my ascent and sparkling green Devonshire cup corals made interesting subjects. But it was when I got back up to around 18m that the most impressive feature of the dive presented itself.

Initially I must have landed on the only piece of barren rock down here, as a dense covering of dead mens fingers covered the wall, before being displaced with colonies of massive plumose anemones. I had never seen these animals grow to such a size before! They were easily more than half a metre tall, vast pillars of orange and white forming a forest over the top of the reef.

Schools of small pollack darted between them, but sheltering in the forest were big old edible crabs, butterfish and the aggressive velvet-backed swimming crabs, whose red eyes glared from their cover as they tried to make their escape. I used up the remainder of my film on the top of the pinnacle around 10m down.

We had got off to a great start, but having watched the CD-Rom Malcolm had sent me, I was itching to get onto one  of the little puffer wrecks I had seen on my PC screen. After returning to Tarbert and looking around the ruins of Robert the Bruces castle, we were off to dive the Arran III.

Arran III

I had often thought about diving this wreck from the shore. Once at the site the reality of the task dawned on me, and I was glad that I hadnt bothered.

It looked a long way, though dedicated divers do make the trek. Little Blue makes the dive a lot more comfortable.

Falling over the stern, I followed the instructions given by Malcolm. I landed at the stern of Arran III at around 12m. This is the only section of the wreck that remains intact.

This Clyde puffer, or small steamboat, had run straight onto the rocks on the first day of 1932. As you would expect, the bows are completely broken up in 5m. There is still a lot of wreckage to explore, even if it is covered with kelp in the summer months.

Finning aft to the stern, the wreck gradually takes shape and scenic spars coated with red seaweed rise like clutching fingers. Lifeboat davits and mooring bollards are clearly visible.

Beneath the stern, a group of massive edible crabs was noted and it was good hunting for the Hartlepool club.

Back at the stern, I hung about and tried to capture an image of the massive pollack that patrol the area. They would shoot off when my flash fired, only to circle and take up the same holding position. There is also a big conger eel on the wreck that Malcolm called Curly.

I didnt find him, but other divers did.

He was out posing for pictures.

The Arran III, like all Clyde puffers, made deliveries to all the Clyde ports. Many of these, such as those in Loch Fyne, were in extremely remote areas where no road communication was possible. She met her fate while returning from Lochgilphead with empty beer bottles for recycling.

A storm with severe south-easterly gales blew up, and from that direction the winds could run right up the loch.

As Arran III approached Tarbert, she became more exposed to the fury of the storm. In the terrible conditions at 6.30am that Hogmanay, she ran aground on a reef east of Baltimore island. Badly holed, she sank on the next high tide. Her cargo was salvaged.

Margaret Niven

Next morning,  after emptying a couple of beer bottles the night before, I was glad of the civilised 9.30 start. The poor weather had arrived but was doing little to affect the sea state, as it was all coming from a westerly direction.

Very close to the resting place of the Arran III lies another puffer, and it was to be my favourite dive of the weekend.

I was first in and onto the Margaret Niven, which is a great benefit if you want to photograph it. The shotline was attached to the prow in just over 28m. The green water had turned black but my eyes soon adjusted to the gloom. Vis was a respectable 6m but it soon shrank to 3m once the bottom-huggers arrived.

The whole bow section lay before me, rising a couple of metres out of the muddy seabed. First there was a set of large winches and bollards. After that, the hold opened and the cargo of road chippings was clearly visible.

The Clyde puffers were working to put themselves out of business by delivering the raw materials to build the highways.

At the stern, the main points of interest were a large boiler with a tiny one-cylinder engine directly behind it – the powerhouse behind the whole Clyde transport system of the early

20th century.

Dropping over the stern and down a couple of metres, I could see the small prop and the rudder hard to starboard, perhaps thrust there in a last-ditch effort to avoid the rock on which Margaret Niven ended her sailing days.

She must have sunk fairly quickly, as the wreck lies 10m off the bottom of that very rock. If you feel comfortable about it, you can fin straight off the bows for 10m and ascend up the vertical cliff. This will give you plenty of interest to help you wile away your deco stops.

Kelp obscures everything above 6m, but the wall is covered in soft corals. The cracks and crevices are home to edible crabs and the guys from Hartlepool all saw lesser-spotted dogfish on every dive, with a few noted on the cliff here. These small sharks are common in the loch. Catch a lazy one and it will make a great photographic subject.

Moyle Rock

After a long steam up the loch we arrived at Moyle Rock, a submerged pinnacle. After the long wait, it was all go as soon as we reached at the site.

It was billed as similar to the Garden, which was magic. The difference was that Malcolm, who is also a keen diver, had apparently seen plumose anemones that made the Gardens look small.

I found the site under water by hitting the pinnacle at 18m and working up to around 6m, but with not a lot to show for it. I was about to surface when flashes of orange and white caught my eye. I headed south, and soon plumose anemones appeared, though they could not rival those of the Garden.

I think I was on the right site, and none of the other divers saw anything much apart from another dogfish.

If you have the choice, I would always opt for the Garden rather than waste time steaming to this site. However, on the way back we had the bonus of noting a large group of porpoises heading up the loch.

Back in Tarbert, it was pack-up time and then a three-hour drive home. Was it worth it You bet – the diving is great and relaxed, and Malcolm is a cheerful skipper who provides excellent briefings based on diving knowledge along with the hot drinks and chocolate biscuits.

Tarbert is a beautiful place, where people still say hello and pass the time of day. The pubs are great for a couple of nice pints post-meal. Give it a try.”

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